Tutankhamun Tomb and History

Tutankhamun Tomb and History

Tutankhamun Tomb and History
Tutankhamun Tomb and History

Tutankhamun was an Egyptian pharaoh of the 18th dynasty, during the period of Egyptian history known as the New Kingdom or sometimes the New Empire Period. He has, since his discovery, been colloquially referred to as King Tut.

 The world of archaeology was electrified last year by the news that Tutankhamun’s tomb could contain hidden chambers possibly containing the remains and riches of Queen Nefertiti. It was a story that seemed to have everything: false walls, buried treasure, at least one mummy – and new hope for Egypt’s ailing tourist industry.

Tutankhamun Tomb
Tutankhamun Tomb 

Tutankhamun's secret? Experts hope new chambers could contain tomb of Nefertiti
Read more
There was just one problem: the announcement now seems to be unfounded. But scientists say the evidence, based on new research, is being suppressed by the government in Cairo.


The announcement in November by the then minister of antiquities, Mamdouh Eldamaty, that he was “90% positive” that an earlier radar scan of the tomb had revealed an unexplored chamber, galvanised worldwide excitement, and seemed to add weight to the theory of a British Egyptologist, Richard Reeves, that the tomb was also the intact burial site of Nefertiti, widely believed to be Tutankhamun’s stepmother and who may have preceded him as pharaoh.

King Tut
King Tut

How did tutankhamun die?

King Tutankhamun did not die in chariot crash, virtual autopsy reveals
New research indicates the boy king mostly likely died as a result of genetic impairments which weakened his body.

In 1922, Howard Carter and his team made what would become perhaps the greatest archaeological discovery of all time. It was the intact tomb of an Egyptian pharaoh of the 18th Dynasty: Tutankhamun. The ‘boy-king’ has since become one of the most famous figures from the ancient world and his face – more particularly his golden death mask – provides us with one of the most iconic images from anywhere, and at any time.

How did tutankhamun die
How did tutankhamun die

The Valley of the Kings was the burial place of the pharaohs throughout the great era we now call the New Kingdom (1550–1069 BC), and its use helps to define the period.

Fast-forward 3,000 years, and the valley was the site of a series of spectacular discoveries in the 19th and early 20th centuries AD. A map made by Napoleon’s scientific expedition in the early 1800s recorded the position of 16 tombs. By the time of the First World War, that number had risen to 61.

The great American lawyer and patron of work in the valley, Theodore Davis, was responsible for many of the more recent of these discoveries, but in 1914, after a couple of disappointing seasons, he declared the valley to be “exhausted”. Carter, however, thought otherwise, believing there still to be tombs left undiscovered, including that of Tutankhamun. Under the patronage of the 5th Earl of Carnarvon he began excavations in the valley in 1917. After a few unproductive seasons, and with Carnarvon’s patience very nearly exhausted, he made the greatest discovery of them all.

Tutankhamun Mask
Tutankhamun Mask


Although he does not appear in any contemporary king-lists, scholars were aware of Tutankhamun prior to Carter’s masterstroke, and that he had reigned at least into a ninth year. He was believed, correctly, to have been a king of the Amarna period (when the pharaohs’ residence was sited in the city of Amarna). He was also noted for his role in reintroducing the worship of the god Amun, following the reign of his predecessor and probable father, Akhenaten, who had abandoned traditional Egyptian polytheism and introduced worship centred on the god Aten. This much is revealed by the fact that Tut changed his name at some point from Tutankhaten to Tutankhamun.

what year did tutankhamun die

what year did tutankhamun die??

Tutankhamun was an Egyptian pharaoh of the 18th dynasty (ruled c. 1332 - 1323 BC in the conventional chronology), during the period of Egyptian history known as the New Kingdom or sometimes the New Empire Period. He has, since his discovery, been colloquially referred to as King Tut. His original name, Tutankhaten, means "Living Image of Aten", while Tutankhamun means "Living Image of Amun". In hieroglyphs, the name Tutankhamun was typically written Amen-tut-ankh, because of a scribal custom that placed a divine name at the beginning of a phrase to show appropriate reverence. He is possibly also the Nibhurrereya of the Amarna letters, and likely the 18th dynasty king Rathotis who, according to Manetho, an ancient historian, had reigned for nine years a figure that conforms with Flavius Josephus's version of Manetho's Epitome.


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